Category Archives: New books

Next book buys…

I always carry a list, tucked into the case of my mobile phone, of books that will be my next purchases. It’s not that I’m ever desperate for something to read—far from it! One of the joys of acquiring books is that I always have a stack of interesting titles just waiting for when I finish the one I’m reading. Sometimes I’m well and truly ready to move on to something new; other times, it’s a wrench to emerge from a fictional world, and I need some time before choosing to enter another.

These are the latest additions to my list…

Rebecca Lim
Tiger Daughter
Allen & Unwin
$16.99

Yes, this one’s for young people (ages 11–14), which I’m not!, but I adore Rebecca’s writing and won’t be letting that stop me. Here’s the blurb:

What I feel most days is that nothing is ever going to change. That my life won’t even start, and that I’ll be stuck like this forever.

Wen Zhou is the daughter and only child of Chinese immigrants whose move to the lucky country has proven to be not so lucky. Wen and her friend, Henry Xiao—whose mum and dad are also struggling immigrants—both dream of escape from their unhappy circumstances, and form a plan to sit an entrance exam to a selective high school far from home. But when tragedy strikes, it will take all of Wen’s resilience and resourcefulness to get herself and Henry through the storm that follows.

Tiger Daughter is a novel that will grab hold of you and not let go.

Irma Gold
The Breaking
MidnightSun Publishing
$29.99

I’m looking forward to reading this debut novel from Irma Gold, who has previously published a short fiction collection and is widely published in journals. The Breaking, with themes of animal exploitation and female friendship, is due for release in March.

Hannah Bird has just arrived in Thailand. Disoriented and out of her depth, she meets Deven, a fierce and gutsy Australian expat who sweeps her into thrilling adventures rescuing elephants.

As they head deeper and deeper into the fraught world of elephant tourism, their lives become tangled in ways Hannah never imagined. But how far will they go to save a life?

Hannah is about to make a critical decision from which there will be no turning back, with shattering consequences.

The Breaking is an extraordinary debut. Sharply observed and richly vivid, it is an intensely moving story about the magnetic bond between two young women and the enduring cost of animal exploitation. It is at once devastating and exhilarating, and ultimately transformative.

What’s on your reading list?

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An essential book for writers, or for the writer in your life

Georgia Richter & Deborah Hunn
How to Be an Author: The Business of Being a Writer in Australia
Fremantle Press
Non-fiction
RRP $34.99

This new release from Fremantle Press, authored by publisher/editor Georgia Richter and writer/lecturer Deborah Hunn, is an essential guide for new, emerging and established authors in Australia on the business aspects of authorship. There are countless books out there on how to write—the one thing this one does not cover—but none that I know of that deal so comprehensively, and in a specifically Australian context, with the dizzying array of other things that writers need to know, whether they want to or not.

The cover displays some of the subjects the book tackles, although there are many more. There’s plenty of solid industry advice, lists of dos and don’ts, and answers to the kinds of questions that Richter and Hunn routinely field in the course of their professional lives.

The authors also canvassed a group of authors and industry professionals, across a range of genres and specialisations, for tips, experiences and practical advice on particular subjects. I’m proud to be included in this stellar group:

Liz Byrski, Alan Carter, Nandi Chinna, Tim Coronel, Amanda Curtin, Daniel de Lorne, Deb Fitzpatrick, James Foley, Alecia Hancock, Stephen Kinnane, Ambelin Kwaymullina, Natasha Lester, Brigid Lowry, Caitlin Maling, Meg McKinlay, Claire Miller, Brendan Ritchie, Rachel Robertson, Holden Sheppard, Sasha Wasley, David Whish-Wilson and Anne-Louise Willoughby.

The book is entertaining, well written, well designed and easy to navigate, and includes a great section on resources and a useful index.

It’s the kind of book that I wish had been around when I was starting out—and even now I know I’ll be consulting it again and again!

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