Writers ask writers: author for a day

kirstenkrauth_webThis month in our Writers Ask Writers series, the question posed is: If you could jump into the life of another author, past or present, for one day, who would it be and why? And it’s a pleasure to welcome, as guest blogger for August, Kirsten Krauth, who has recently released her accomplished debut novel, just_a_girl, described as ‘a Puberty Blues for the digital age’. There are links at the end to Kirsten’s choice of author, along with those of Annabel Smith, Natasha Lester, Sara Foster, Emma Chapman and Dawn Barker.

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Katharine Susannah Prichard seems to have been a presence in my life since the beginning of my writing career. The first validation I ever received as a writer was as winner of the Katharine Susannah Prichard Short Fiction Award in 1996. And a few years later, a story of mine called ‘The prospect of grace’, which draws on the lives of four famous couples including Katharine Susannah Prichard and Hugo Throssell, won the Patricia Hackett Prize for best contribution to the literary journal Westerly (the story has since been included in Inherited).

DSCN3567I have been a member of the Katharine Susannah Prichard Writers Centre, in the Perth hills suburb of Greenmount, for many years, and last weekend I spent a few hours there fulfilling my duties as a member of the Literary Advisory Board. Serendipitous, because it gave me an opportunity to take a photograph of the lovely old weatherboard house that was once Katharine’s home and place of work, and is now still a place where writers work—and learn and share writerly things.

Katharine Susannah Prichard was productive in her long lifetime. It makes me reel to think of what she achieved: 13 novels (translated into 13 foreign languages for international publication), 10 plays, five short story collections, two volumes of poetry, an autobiography, a work of non-fiction, and many pamphlets and articles. I doubt there are many literary writers who could come close today.

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While I admire this amazing output, it is not the reason I would choose to be Katharine Susannah Prichard for a day.

Nor is it because she had an especially happy life. She did not—or so it appears, at this distance, to me. I don’t doubt that there was happiness, both through her writing and in her personal life; one only has to read the passionate dedication to Hugo Throssell in her autobiography, Child of the Hurricane, to know there was love:

To you, all those wild weeds
and wind flowers of my life,
I bring, my lord,
and lay them at your feet;
they are not frankincense
or myrrh
but you were Krishna, Christ and Dionysus
in your beauty, tenderness and strength.

But she also lived through unbearable personal sadness, losing her father and, later, her husband to suicide. And as someone who cared deeply about social justice, and believed in fighting for something better for all of humanity, happiness frequently eluded her.

As a young journalist, she worked in the slums of Melbourne, witnessing the plight of women slaving in sweatshops. In 1908–09, she spent a year in England, a time of hunger marches, Salvation Army soup kitchens and extreme poverty—symptomatic of a fraying social fabric (as Virginia Woolf was to say, ‘On or about December 1910, human character changed’). Returning to England just before the First World War, she remained there throughout the war years, and took part in suffragette marches and feminist lectures on women’s issues such as birth control. For a week in 1914 she reported from the battlefront in France.

These experiences deepened her compassion for the powerless, a thread running through so many of her novels—exploited Aboriginal women in Coonardoo (and the play Brumby Innes), returned servicemen in Intimate Strangers, struggling timber workers in Working Bullocks.

DSCN3573They also formed in her a great interest in pacifism and socialism and, later, in communism—and this last made her a target of official inquiry. It took guts to be a communist in those times. She became known as ‘the Red Witch of Greenmount’, and during the years of the Second World War her house was searched and she was put under surveillance amid fears that she was signalling from the hills to enemy craft at sea!

It’s not because I long to be notorious that I would wish myself into Katharine’s skin.

But I admire Katharine Susannah Prichard. I admire her commitment and her compassion—and especially her fearlessness. And that is why I would like to be her for a day. I would like to feel that kind of fearlessness in my blood. I harbour a suspicion that I might also find it an adulterated brew, tainted with the self-doubt and uncertainty that are found in any writer. But I imagine, I am sure, there is much I could learn about courage from this remarkable woman, this compassionate writer.

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Here are the links to companion posts from our group and guest Kirsten Krauth:

Kirsten Krauth: When I was a kid, a family member was obsessed with [Leonard Cohen] … I always rolled my eyes; it’s so embarrassing when adults think their music is cool.—Read more here

Annabel Smith: [As Truman Capote] the day would begin with me lounging in my smoking jacket while I opened my mail, including fan mail, letters of outrage about my sexuality and moral degeneracy …—Read more here

Natasha Lester: [Joan Didion] made meaning out of her life. She wrote about unique experiences in a way that made them seem commonplace and connective.—Read more here

Sara Foster: I will go back to a day in 1990 on a crowded train and become JK Rowling the moment she met Harry Potter in her imagination for the first time …—Read more here

Emma Chapman: I wanted to write about the stereotype of the ideal writer: someone who is free to write when they want, read when they want, and take the day off when they want. That’s the life I wanted …—Read more here

Dawn Barker: Mary Shelley … had lots of trauma in her life, but she had one wonderful summer that would change her life and propel her into literary history.—Read more here

PWFC author collage

18 Comments

Filed under Writers ask writers

18 responses to “Writers ask writers: author for a day

  1. Louise Allan

    What a remarkable lady she was — truly inspirational. A thinker, a leader, an intellect. And that she did all of this a century ago. I’d love to get inside her mind, too, even for a day. Who knows, some of that strength of character might rub off …

  2. It wouldn’t be a usual – or popular or ‘cool’ – choice but I would be Hemingway for a day. The difficulty would be choosing which day, or era. Too much amazingness to choose from. It’s a lovely exercise indeed. Thanks for liking my post(s) at my blog, appreciate it! Jenny

  3. Jenny, maybe it’s just me but I think Hemingway would be a popular AND cool choice! Emma Chapman briefly canvasses the possibility in her post. I wouldn’t mind a window into that mind, but maybe not for a day? 🙂 Thanks for stopping by, and always a pleasure to read your blog.

  4. Wonderful post, Amanda. Thank you for introducing me to Katharine Susannah Prichard. She sounds like someone I’d like to get to know.

    • A pleasure, Angela, and thank you. In terms of her output and international reach, she was probably one of Australia’s leading literary figures of the first half of the twentieth century, but unfamiliar to most these days. Her social realist style has fallen from favour, but Coonardoo is a classic and Intimate Strangers, though ultimately unsuccessful in its resolution, for tragic reasons, is a rare example of urban fiction of the Depression era.
      There I go, wafflng on! I really just wanted to say thanks for reading 🙂

  5. Lovely, thoughtful post, and it makes me want to re acquaint myself with Katherine. Especially love the words you quote – ‘Krishna, Christ and Dionysus in your beauty, tenderness and strength’ – beautiful sentiment. Time to hunt down my copy of Coonardoo! Thank you Amanda x

    • I love that dedication, too, Rashida, in spite of its anachronistic tones of (false) subservience; I think the raw heart of it manages still to transcend that. If you can’t find your copy, I have a lovely battered, foxed first edition… 🙂 Thanks x

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  10. I was just wondering if you have seen the Western Australian Playwright Suzanne Ingelbrecht’s play about the life of Katherine Susannah Prichard? I saw it a few years ago and it was a beautiful and powerful dramatization of her life… Amanda, your piece brought it all back. Her courage and commitment. Thank you so much.

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